HDC Kids VV

Protecting Your Kids From False Beliefs at Halloween

Many parents worry about shielding their children from dangerous non-Christian influences. This is especially true at Halloween, which has become a $6 billion holiday. Because of the costumes and candy, most children adore Halloween. But parents face a dilemma: How much should children participate in a holiday that focuses on scary images often glamorizing death and the occult? Avoiding Halloween entirely is one option. Another is providing Christian alternatives such as harvest events (click here to check out what we're doing for AMPED). Parents can also provide children with a faith-based understanding of Halloween. You can use the holiday to discover the differences between God’s truth and false beliefs. Here are ways to start: Explore children’s fears regarding death. Kids often ask tough questions that make adults uncomfortable. When topics such as death and the devil arise, let your home be a safe place where children can express their fears. Then turn to the Bible for answers. Share with children the history of Halloween. The holiday first marked the eve of All Hallows or All Saints’ Day, when Christians remember saints who’ve died. Talk about special family members or friends who are now in heaven with Jesus. Also share that all who believe in Jesus are called to be saints, or holy people (see Romans 1:7). Put on the “armor of God” as protection against evil. Read aloud Ephesians 6:10-20 and discuss how God keeps us safe. Let children dress up in this armor; for example, wear the belt of truth to recognize Satan’s lies and resist his temptations.   What are you doing to help your kids celebrate Halloween in the right way?

Many parents worry about shielding their children from dangerous non-Christian influences. This is especially true at Halloween, which has become a $6 billion holiday. Because of the costumes and candy, most children adore Halloween. But parents face a dilemma: How much should children participate in a holiday that focuses on scary images often glamorizing death and the occult?

Avoiding Halloween entirely is one option. Another is providing Christian alternatives such as harvest events (click here to check out what we're doing for AMPED). Parents can also provide children with a faith-based understanding of Halloween. You can use the holiday to discover the differences between God’s truth and false beliefs. Here are ways to start:

  • Explore children’s fears regarding death. Kids often ask tough questions that make adults uncomfortable. When topics such as death and the devil arise, let your home be a safe place where children can express their fears. Then turn to the Bible for answers.

  • Share with children the history of Halloween. The holiday first marked the eve of All Hallows or All Saints’ Day, when Christians remember saints who’ve died. Talk about special family members or friends who are now in heaven with Jesus. Also share that all who believe in Jesus are called to be saints, or holy people (see Romans 1:7).

  • Put on the “armor of God” as protection against evil. Read aloud Ephesians 6:10-20 and discuss how God keeps us safe. Let children dress up in this armor; for example, wear the belt of truth to recognize Satan’s lies and resist his temptations.

 

What are you doing to help your kids celebrate Halloween in the right way?