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How to Increase The Quantity of Quality Time You Spend With Your Kids

“Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God, the LORD is one. Love the LORD your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength. These commandments that I give you today are to be upon your hearts. Impress them on your children. Talk about them when you sit at home and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up.” – Deuteronomy 6:4-7 (NIV) Children learn best through routine, and when families create the right rhythm it helps to accentuate learning and development. Although every family should look for the patterns that work best for them in light of their schedules, four specific times are listed in the passage above that any family can leverage to build the faith of their children. Consider the following ideas: Eating meals together is an optimal time to have a focused discussion. It gives parents a specific time to connect with their kids and engage them in meaningful conversation. I could list a lot of overused stats here, like the ones that claim the more meals families eat together, the better chance their children have of never taking drugs or going to prison. But I won’t do that. Walking or traveling together seems to provide a unique opportunity as well. It is a convenient time to stimulate the kind of informal dialogue that allows kids to drive their own agendas. These times give parents an opportunity to build a relationship through nonthreatening experiences. At some levels you can actually function as a friend and interpret life together with your children. Drive time with your kids is also a great time to do this. Tucking children into bed can also be a meaningful time for families.  Too many parents miss the potential of this time because they have a habit of sending their kids to bed rather than taking them. Have you ever seen a child get mad and go to their room and shut the door? It’s like their saying, “I am upset with you and closing you out.” The door to a child’s room is an important metaphorical door to keep open. Getting up in the morning provides a blank page for the family to start fresh relationally. Just a few encouraging words carefully spoken or written can give your children a sense of value and instill purpose. Ask yourself this question, “What can I say or do to give them fuel for dealing with whatever they have to face today?” What can you do this week to increase the quantity of quality time that you spend with your kids?

Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God, the LORD is one. Love the LORD your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength. These commandments that I give you today are to be upon your hearts. Impress them on your children. Talk about them when you sit at home and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up.” – Deuteronomy 6:4-7 (NIV)


Children learn best through routine, and when families create the right rhythm it helps to accentuate learning and development. Although every family should look for the patterns that work best for them in light of their schedules, four specific times are listed in the passage above that any family can leverage to build the faith of their children. Consider the following ideas:

Eating meals together is an optimal time to have a focused discussion. It gives parents a specific time to connect with their kids and engage them in meaningful conversation. I could list a lot of overused stats here, like the ones that claim the more meals families eat together, the better chance their children have of never taking drugs or going to prison. But I won’t do that.

Walking or traveling together seems to provide a unique opportunity as well. It is a convenient time to stimulate the kind of informal dialogue that allows kids to drive their own agendas. These times give parents an opportunity to build a relationship through nonthreatening experiences. At some levels you can actually function as a friend and interpret life together with your children. Drive time with your kids is also a great time to do this.

Tucking children into bed can also be a meaningful time for families.  Too many parents miss the potential of this time because they have a habit of sending their kids to bed rather than taking them. Have you ever seen a child get mad and go to their room and shut the door? It’s like their saying, “I am upset with you and closing you out.” The door to a child’s room is an important metaphorical door to keep open.

Getting up in the morning provides a blank page for the family to start fresh relationally. Just a few encouraging words carefully spoken or written can give your children a sense of value and instill purpose. Ask yourself this question, “What can I say or do to give them fuel for dealing with whatever they have to face today?”

What can you do this week to increase the quantity of quality time that you spend with your kids?